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  • The UN Security Council and Abdelrazik

    Canadian Abousfian Abdelrazik is on the U.S. Security Council’s Al Qaida sanctions committee list. His assets are frozen and he is subject to an international travel ban. His case generated substantial notoriety when the Canadian government resisted his repatriation from Sudan on the basis, among other things, of his listing. It has generated even more

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  • Taiwan’s Presidential Candidates and their Indigenous Platforms

    This essay first appeared on the Taiwan 2012 blog. Indigenous people, accounting for about 2% of Taiwan’s population, are unlikely to influence the 2012 presidential election outcomes. Nonetheless, the relative success of the candidates in indigenous communities may influence elections for the Legislative Yuan, which has a quota of six indigenous legislators. The way in

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  • What Should the G20 Accomplish in Cannes?

    On Thursday and Friday of this week, the leaders of the G20 will meet in Cannes to discuss the numerous problems that the world economy is currently experiencing. The big question on everyone’s mind is whether they will be able to restore some kind of confidence in financial markets as well as with consumers and

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  • Le règne du On the Cheap pour les F-35

    Cela fait plusieurs années que les Forces canadiennes sont passées maîtres du faire beaucoup avec peu; le Canada fait peu d’envieux, mais son personnel est qualifié et réputé pour savoir tirer le maximum d’un matériel qui n’est pas toujours aussi performant qu’on serait en droit de s’y attendre. On peut avoir en sainte horreur la

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  • Canada and UNDRIP: Moving Forward on Indigenous Diplomacy

    The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) was adopted by the General Assembly on September 13, 2007, with 144 states in favour, 11 abstentions, and 4 votes against. Canada, like Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, originally voted against UNDRIP, but eventually changed its policy. In the March 2010 Speech

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  • The World Economy in Turmoil

    Recession is again at the world economy’s door, with confidence plummeting and investors, businesses and consumers lacking the trust in the future that is necessary to create economic growth. In Europe, the euro crisis seemed to have reached some kind of denouement with last week’s deal on a revised second bail-out package for Greece, although

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  • Protection Racket

    The Responsibility to Protect may indeed protect some civilians, but unfortunately it also facilitates atrocities against others. Writing last week about the end of NATO’s mission in Libya, Lloyd Axworthy and Allan Rock proclaimed it as ‘A victory for the Responsibility to Protect’. But according to a report issued this weekend by Human Rights Watch,

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  • NATO: Power and Principles in the Contemporary Era

    On Oct. 27, the United Nations Security Council voted to end international military operations in Libya as of November 1. For NATO, the completion of its mission in Libya represents a rare clear-cut victory. As Michael Clarke, director of the Royal United Services Institute, a London-based think tank, argued, NATO officials “can say unambiguously this

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  • NATO’s Success in Libya

    This post first appeared on the CIC’s Roundtable blog at opencanada.org. NATO’s operation in Libya formally ends at midnight today. All told, its aircraft conducted almost 10,000 strike missions over 7 months. When the mission began, many commentators warned that the intervention would result in a quagmire that might draw western forces into another endless,

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  • Run Towards War with Iran

    In the wake of the alleged plot to assassinate the Saudi ambassador to Washington, the predictable chorus of right-wingers has come forward to promote one of their favourite causes: the idea of an attack on Iran. Not surprisingly, the idea of an attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities features highly in all of this. Many of those who

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  • Libya and Canada’s Political Influence: A Different Perspective

    Did Canada play a critical political role in relation to the Libya intervention? My colleague Roland Paris is skeptical. In an earlier post on this blog, he points out that Canada’s political influence was secondary at best, since the Canadian government lost a bid to have a seat on the United Nations Security Council, which

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  • Did Canada Play a “Critical” Role in Libya?

    Prime Minister Stephen Harper continues to take bows for Canada’s involvement in the Libya mission. “Canada has played a critical role both politically and militarily to protect innocent civilians against a cruel and oppressive regime,” he said in a statement issued today. Mr. Harper certainly deserves credit for committing Canadian ships and airplanes to the NATO

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